Validating occupational coding indexes for use in multi-country surveys

Kea G. Tijdens, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
Casper S. Kaandorp, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands


Occupational coding in multi-country surveys is mostly a black box: have national survey agencies classified the same occupational titles into the same category across countries? This paper attempts to validate the coding from 5-digit occupational titles into the 4-digit occupational units of the international ISCO-08 classification, based on a comparison of coding indexes from national statistical offices. Two research objectives are central. To what extent are occupational titles in the coding indexes similar, when comparing their English translations? What percentage of similar occupational titles is coded similarly across countries? To answer these questions, we merged titles from 20 coding indexes …


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Investigating Respondent Multitasking and Distraction Using Self-reports and Interviewers’ Observations in a Dual-frame Telephone Survey

Eva Aizpurua, Center for Social and Behavioral Research, University of Northern Iowa & School of Law, Trinity College Dublin
Erin O. Heiden, Center for Social and Behavioral Research, University of Northern Iowa
Ki H. Park, Center for Social and Behavioral Research, University of Northern Iowa
Jill Wittrock, Center for Social and Behavioral Research, University of Northern Iowa
Mary E. Losch, Center for Social and Behavioral Research, University of Northern Iowa


Previous research has shown that people often engage in other activities while responding to surveys and that respondents’ multitasking generally has no effect on indicators of data quality (e.g., item non-response, non-differentiation). One of the limitations of these studies is that they have mostly used self-reported measures of respondents’ multitasking. We build on prior research by combining self-reported measures of multitasking with interviewers' observations of respondents' distractions recorded after each interview. The dataset comes from a statewide dual-frame random digit dial telephone survey of adults in a Midwestern state (n = 1,006) who were queried on topics related to awareness …


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Evaluation of Gaining Cooperation Methods for IVR Surveys in Low- and Middle-income Countries

Ashley Amaya, RTI International
Charles Lau, RTI International
Yaa Owusu-Amoah, VOTO Mobile
Jocelyn Light, VOTO Mobile


Interactive voice response (IVR) is gaining popularity as a data collection method for survey research. In low- and middle-income countries, IVR is used as a primary data collection mode. The system places an out-bound dial; when the individual answers, he/she hears a recorded greeting and invitation to begin the survey. This approach has the benefit of reducing labor costs, but without an interviewer, there is no one to help gain cooperation, answer questions, or identify the appropriate language in which to continue, resulting in low production outcome rates (e.g., cooperation rate, response rate). In this paper, we use experiments embedded …


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Collecting Multiple Data Linkage Consents in a Mixed-mode Survey: Evidence from a large-scale longitudinal study in the UK

Marie Thornby, formerly UCL Institute of Education, UK
Lisa Calderwood, UCL Institute of Education, UK
Mehul Kotecha, NatCen Social Research, UK
Kelsey Beninger, Kantar Public, formerly NatCen Social Research, UK
Alessandra Gaia, City, University of London, formerly UCL Institute of Education, UK


Linking survey responses with administrative data is a promising practice to increase the range of research questions to be explored, at a limited interview burden, both for respondents and interviewers. We describe the protocol for asking consent to data linkage on nine different sources in a large-scale nationally representative longitudinal survey of young adults in England: the Next Steps Age 25 Survey. We present empirical evidence on consent to data linkage from qualitative interviews, a pilot study, and the mainstage survey. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that discusses the practicalities of implementing a data …


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Response Rates in the European Social Survey: Increasing, Decreasing, or a Matter of Fieldwork Efforts?

Koen Beullens, KU Leuven, Belgium
Geert Loosveldt, KU Leuven, Belgium
Caroline Vandenplas, KU Leuven, Belgium
Ineke Stoop, SCP The Hague, The Netherlands


Response rates are declining increasing the risk of nonresponse error. The reasons for this decline are multiple: the rise of online surveys, mobile phones, and information requests, societal changes, greater awareness of privacy issues, etc. To combat this decline, fieldwork efforts have become increasingly intensive: widespread use of respondent incentives, advance letters, and an increased number of contact attempts. In addition, complex fieldwork strategies such as adaptive call scheduling or responsive designs have been implemented. The additional efforts to counterbalance nonresponse complicate the measurement of the increased difficulty of contacting potential respondents and convincing them to cooperate. To observe developments …


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